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Degree Requirements and Process

We offer a 31-unit Master’s Degree in Political Science, designed to offer disciplinary breadth as well as flexibility for individualized programs of study. Students are encouraged to develop a plan of study that meets their individual preferences and goals, while meeting the degree requirements below. In some instances, it may be possible to petition for exceptions to requirements, with the approval of the graduate advisor. All of the courses earn 3 units, unless noted otherwise. 

  • POL S 615 - Seminar in Research Design and Analysis in Political Science 
  • POL S 675 - Seminar in International Relations 
  • POL S 605 - Seminar in Political Theory 
  • POL S 603 - Seminar in Foundations of Public Policy 
    OR
    POL S 655 - Seminar in General Comparative Political Systems 
  • POL S 798 Special Study, Preparation for Culminating Experience (1 unit)
  1. Two graduate seminars (6 units) chosen from among the following list. Elective seminars may not repeat other courses being used toward degree requirements unless the course permits repeated enrollment with different content (605, 630, and 675 only):
    • POL S 603 Seminar in Foundations of Public Policy
    • POL S 605 Seminar in Political Theory
    • POL S 620 Seminar in American National Government
    • POL S 630 Seminar in Politics (Special Topics, varies by semester)
    • POL S 635 Seminar in Politics of Public Policy
    • POL S 655 Seminar in General Comparative Political Systems
    • POL S 658 Seminar in Post-Communist Political Systems
    • POL S 661 Seminar in the Political Systems of the Developing Nations
    • POL S 667 Seminar in Latin American Political Systems
    • POL S 675 Seminar in International Relations
    • POL S 696 Seminar in Selected Topics in Political Science
  2. One graduate course (3 units) chosen from among 500-level courses in Political Science, with the approval of the graduate adviser.

  3. Two additional courses (6 units), which can include Political Science coursework at the 500-700 level, courses from other departments, or transfer courses. Any elective other than 600-level Political Science courses must be pre-approved by the graduate adviser. Only one 3-unit 795, 797, or 798 may be included in the Program of Study (this limit does not include the 1-unit preparation for culminating experience). Plan B students may not take additional Special Studies beyond the 798 to prepare for exams.

  4. Culminating Experience:
    Plan A: Political Science 799A, Thesis (3 units) 
    OR
    Plan B: Comprehensive written and oral examination in two fields, with Political Science 798 (3 units) dedicated to preparation.


Certificate Programs

As of Fall 2022, we also offer two 15-unit Advanced Certificate programs: 1) Comparative and Global Politics, and 2) Public Policy. Students enrolled in our Political Science MA may choose to complete a certificate program simultaneously as a means of specialization. The units for certificate programs can also be used toward the MA. 

Students who are not planning to enroll in the Political Science MA program may apply to a Certificate program alone. 

Previous Program Requirements - for students who entered in Fall 2021 or earlier

Students who entered the program in Fall 2021 or before may find their program requirements below.

Students who want to maintain maximum flexibility in their program of study are advised to opt for the general MA.

Requirements for students selecting the general Political Science MA track

  1. POL S 615 Seminar in Research Design

  2. Three core graduate seminars chosen from among the following:
    • POL S 516 (Statistics and Quantitative methods)
    • POL S 603 (Seminar in Foundations in Public Policy)
    • POL S 605* (Seminar in Political Theory)
    • POL S 620 (Seminar in American National Government)
    • POL S 655 (Seminar in General Comparative Political systems)
    • POL S 675* (Seminar in International Relations) 

    * POL S 605 and POL S 675 can each be taken for credit twice so long as the content of the course differs substantially.

  3. Plan A, Political Science 799A (Thesis) and fifteen additional units of coursework.
    • At least 9 of these units must be 600-level POLS seminars or their equivalents, as approved by the graduate adviser.

    • Up to 6 units may be electives that may include 500-level courses in Political Science, or (with the consent of the graduate adviser) coursework at the 600-level or above in other departments, transfer units, or POLS 798/795 independent studies.

      OR
  4. Plan B, Comprehensive written and oral examination, and eighteen additional units of coursework. 
    • At least 12 of these units must be 600-level POLS seminars or their equivalents, as approved by the graduate adviser.

    • Up to 6 units may be electives that may include 500-level courses in Political Science, or (with the consent of the graduate adviser) coursework at the 600-level or above in other departments, transfer units, or POLS 798/795 independent studies.

See the catalog for a description of courses offered by the department.

This emphasis is designed for students whose primary interests lie in international politics or a comparative study of political trends in a range of regions, including Europe, Latin America, Asia, and the Middle East. Th e IR/Comparative concentration helps students engage in a wide range of research methodologies, including archival analysis, normative analysis, statistical studies, and field research abroad. Our faculty is particularly strong in studies of international law and human rights, imperialism, human migration, transnational activism, and U.S. foreign policy.  

Requirements for students selecting the international relations/comparative politics emphasis:

  1. POL S 615 Seminar in Research Design

  2. POL S 655 Seminar in Comparative Political Systems

  3. POL S 675 Seminar in International Relations

  4. One core graduate seminar chosen from among the following:
    • POL S 516 (Statistics for Political Scientists)
    • POL S 603 (Seminar in Foundations in Public Policy)
    • POL S 605 (Seminar in Political Theory)
    • POL S 658 (Seminar in Post-Communist Political Systems
    • POL S 661 (Seminar in the Political Systems of Developing Nations) 
    • POL S 667 (Seminar in Latin American Political Systems)
  5. Plan A, Political Science 799A (Thesis) and fifteen additional units of coursework.
    • At least 9 of these units must be 600-level POLS seminars or their equivalents, as approved by the graduate adviser.

    • Up to 6 units may be electives that may include 500-level courses in Political Science, or (with the consent of the graduate adviser) coursework at the 600-level or above in other departments, transfer units, or POLS 798/795 independent studies.

      OR
  6. Plan B, Comprehensive written and oral examination, and eighteen additional units of coursework.  
    • At least 12 of these units must be 600-level POLS seminars or their equivalents, as approved by the graduate adviser.

    • Up to 6 units may be electives that may include 500-level courses in Political Science, or (with the consent of the graduate adviser) coursework at the 600-level or above in other departments, transfer units, or POLS 798/795 independent studies.

See the catalog for a description of courses offered by the department.

The emphasis in Public Policy is designed for students interested in a particular issue area (such as immigration, poverty, environment, housing, urban redevelopment, civil or minority rights, health care, or education), or else those with an interest in the general policy process (such as interest groups, social movements, legislative process, or implementation by various agencies). While many of our public policy students have local, state, or American policy interests, we also have students interested in the domestic policies of other countries, such as environmental policy in Latin America, minorities policies in Europe, or internal migration policy in China. 

We offer a broad range of course offerings in our department, but also encourage students to pursue their interest via elective courses in other departments. For example, students interested in public health policy might take courses in SDSU’s School of Public Health; those interested in the environment might add a course on environmental management from the Geography department, etc. 

This emphasis is designed to help students gain skills as policy analysts, expertise in a particular issue area, and familiarity with theories about power and politics in the policy process. It also gives students first-hand experience in their field of interest through an internship. Many students use their internship experience and thesis research as a springboard for a career after their MA is complete.

Requirements for students selecting the emphasis in public policy:

  1. POL S 615 Seminar in Research Design

  2. POL S 603 Seminar in Public Policy

  3. POL S 796 Internship in Public Policy

  4. Two core graduate seminars chosen from among the following:
    • POL S 516 (Statistics for Political Scientists)
    • POL S 605* (Seminar in Political Theory)
    • POL S 620 (Seminar in American National Government)
    • POL S 635 (Seminar in Politics of Public Policy)
    • POL S 655 (Seminar in Comparative Political Systems)
    • POL S 675* (Seminar in International Relations) 
  5. Plan A, Political Science 799A (Thesis) and twelve additional units of coursework.
    • At least 6 of these units must be 600-level POLS seminars or their equivalents, as approved by the graduate adviser.

    • Up to 6 units may be electives that may include 500-level courses in Political Science, or (with the consent of the graduate adviser) coursework at the 600-level or above in other departments, transfer units, or POLS 798/795 independent studies.

      OR
  6. Plan B, Comprehensive written and oral examination, and fifteen additional units of coursework.  
    • At least 9 of these units must be 600-level POLS seminars or their equivalents, as approved by the graduate adviser.

    • Up to 6 units may be electives that may include 500-level courses in Political Science, or (with the consent of the graduate adviser) coursework at the 600-level or above in other departments, transfer units, or POLS 798/795 independent studies.

See the catalog for a description of courses offered by the department.


Path to Graduation

While there is a good deal of flexibility in our M.A. program, there are some steps in the process that must happen in a certain order. 

After being admitted to the program, everyone needs to obtain Classified Graduate Standing, if they do not have it already. If you were admitted conditionally, make sure you know the terms of the conditions and when they need to be met. Once you meet the conditions, it is your responsibility to notify the Graduate Advisor, who will submit paperwork to change your status. 

Everyone needs to submit a Program of Study (POS) for approval by the Graduate Division. This is simply a plan for how you intend to meet the requirements of the degree and track in which you are enrolled. It asks you to list the courses you will take and determine whether you will follow Plan A (Thesis) or Plan B (Exam). Your POS should be submitted roughly at the end of your second semester or the beginning of your third semester. It is necessary to have it approved before you can advance to candidacy or form a thesis or exam committee.

When your Program of Study is approved, it will also be evaluated to see whether you are eligible to Advance to Candidacy. To advance, you need to have completed at least 12 units from your POS with a minimum 3.0 GPA, with no grade lower than a 2.0 (C). In addition, you need to have completed Pol S 615. If you do not qualify to advance when you submit your POS, your record will be reviewed at the end of each semester.

Students complete these degree requirements at varying paces, depending on the other demands on their time and their priorities. Students who maintain full time jobs while they are working on the MA degree by necessity spread the process out over more semesters. Regardless, students will need to start working on the requirements for the Thesis (Plan A) or Comprehensive Exam (Plan B) prior to their final semester in the program. 

For guidance to help you select which culminating experience to adopt, requirements, and advice, see Plan A and Plan B below. Students who would like to chart an efficient, 2-year path through the degree can use the "MA Process Overview" documents here as semester-by-semester planning guides.   

Download: Overview of Thesis Plan A Process | Thesis Checklist

Thesis Process
  1. Develop a thesis topic and question that engages your interest and that contributes something new to the field.

  2. Develop relationships with those faculty who might serve on your committee and engage them in conversation about your plans.

  3. Write a thesis proposal that includes a research question, discussion of its significance or contributions, a literature review, a detailed description of methods, and a complete bibliography.

  4. Meet with your committee members to get feedback on your proposal prior to beginning the empirical portion of the study.

  5. Make sure you have Advanced to Candidacy the semester prior to registering for Pol S 799A (Thesis). To advance to candidacy, you should have a Program of Study approved and have completed Pol S 615.

  6. Start writing the portions you can (Literature Review, Methods, History, etc) the semester prior to enrolling in Pol S 799A.

  7. Register for Pol S 799A, which you do by collecting a form from the Graduate Division, getting signatures from your committee, and returning the form. This class shows up as 3 units on your transcript; however, it counts as full-time study for purposes of financial aid.

  8. Revise drafts of your chapters as advised by your Chair, and later as advised by your other committee members.

  9. If the writing, formatting, and process of approval are not all completed within the deadlines for a graduation in the semester you have enrolled in Pol S 799A, you can enroll in Pol S 799B (Thesis Extension) in order to be registered the semester that you will in fact graduate with a complete, approved, and formatted thesis. Pol S 799B can count as part-time or full-time study for financial aid purposes, and you may need a letter from your chair attesting that you are working on your thesis full time if you need that designation. The good news about Pol S 799B is that you can take it through Extended Studies instead of through regular registration, and the cost is much less than regular fees. They also permit a later registration, if you are not certain whether you will finish in a given semester; check with them regarding their deadlines.

    About finances, deadlines, and graduation:
    The key thing is to be registered in the semester you submit your complete and approved thesis in order to graduate, and to have submitted an Application to Graduate (which you obtain from the Graduate Division) to the Cashier along with the required fee.

    If you will be working on your thesis part-time, or if you need to stop work on your thesis for a period of time before completing it, you do not need to register at all in the meantime.

    If you miss the no-risk deadline for submitting your thesis in the semester that you intended to graduate but are able to have it approved by your committee, formatted, and submitted to Montezuma Publishing prior to noon on the last day of the semester, you do not need to pay for registration the following semester, but instead only need to submit the Application to Graduate with the $55 fee again to the registrar. Your graduation would then get posted the following semester.

  10. Once all committee members are satisfied with your thesis and the revisions you have made, collect their signatures on a formatted signature page.

  11. Format the thesis according to the guidelines from Montezuma Publishing. You may also opt to pay someone do the formatting for you. The thesis template is available on-line at no cost to students. 

  12. Submit the formatted thesis to Montezuma Publishing to have the formatting approved.

  13. Wait for the Graduate Division to process your thesis and notify you that you qualify for graduation (if you have completed all other requirements).

NOTE: The most common error that graduate students make is underestimating the amount of time it takes for approval between the completion of a first draft and the submission of the final copy to the Graduate Division. Please plan on at least two months for that process, and more if your draft needs a lot of work. Give your committee members several weeks to read and respond.

Consider that Montezuma Publishing also takes a substantial chunk of time to review most formatted theses, and for that reason, they typically list a “No-Risk” deadline for submission in early April for a May graduation. If you work backwards from this date, then you would need to have a complete draft of your thesis done by early February in order to post a Spring graduation. In other words, even though you may not be registered for Pol S 799A until your fourth semester, it would be necessary to complete much of the writing prior to that time if you want to graduate at the end of that semester.

For information about formatting requirements and the Thesis Review process, visit the Montezuma Publishing’s Thesis Review Page

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ's) about the thesis
It depends on how quickly you plan to move through the program. If you would like to finish in two years, it would be wise to start giving it some thought your first semester and to try on various options with your choices for class assignments in the first year.
Your committee should consist of two full-time faculty from the Political Science department, and one full-time faculty member from a different department. In exceptional cases, you can petition to have an adjunct or emeritus professor serve on your committee (see below). 

Generally speaking, your committee members should be people with whom you already have a working relationship (for instance, by having taken a seminar or independent study with them). This is especially true of the members within the department. Try to select people who have complementary areas of expertise related to your project; for instance, it helps to have someone who knows the theoretical literature you are speaking to as well as someone who knows something about your substantive topic. Ideally, someone should be able to mentor your research method, and someone should be familiar with your geography (particularly if you are doing a comparative study in another global region).

It is rare to find a single person who has expertise in all the theoretical and empirical aspects of your study. For the member outside the department, consider including someone who offers whatever the committee members from the department cannot provide you (e.g. expertise on your geography, method, or literature) – you might confer with your chair about what department(s) or person(s) might be appropriate.

No. The chair of your committee will play a critical role, and you will probably work most closely with this faculty member. Typically, the chair is the one who reads and edits your chapter drafts, and other committee members give feedback once there is a complete, viable draft in place. In local parlance, the Chair is the First Reader, the other member of the Political Science dept is the Second Reader, and the member from an outside department is the Third Reader. 

Yes. We have recently incorporated this practice as an official requirement. You will be asked to write a research design for Pol S 615, and it is advised to try to propose something that might be your thesis. Before asking your committee members to “sign on” to your thesis, you should develop a thesis proposal that includes: a research question, discussion of its significance or contributions, a literature review, a detailed description of methods, and a complete bibliography. If you do not develop a proposal to your liking in Pol S 615, you might consider doing an independent study with the person you would like to have chair your committee in which you work to review the relevant literatures, develop a research plan, and compose the proposal. This process should take place the semester prior to when you plan to collect your data and begin to write.

It is also highly recommended that you arrange a meeting with all three committee members to discuss your thesis proposal and give you feedback before you do all the empirical work. If there are any problems with your plan or any disagreements among your committee members, you will want to get them cleared up sooner rather than later. You certainly do not want to have any committee member read your completed thesis and then refuse to approve it because they thought you should have done something else. Again, while the meeting with all committee members is not formally required, it would be a very good idea for your own protection. Such meetings also tend to have an open, brainstorming mode that can be incredibly useful to you for developing your plans. Consider recording the conversation so you can refer back to it later.

Download: Overview of Exam Plan B Process

Exam Committee and Content

Students electing to pursue Plan B in their program of study rather than writing a thesis should begin the process by forming a comprehensive examination committee consisting of two faculty members representing any two areas of study within political science. All members of the committee must be on the faculty of the Political Science department. Visiting or Part-time faculty may serve as appropriate and as approved by the Graduate Advisor.

The content and format of the exam will depend upon a contractual agreement that the student develops with the two committee members. In each case, the student should work to put together an appropriate bibliography for which she or he will be responsible in that field of study and have this content amended as necessary and approved by the committee member grading that portion of the exam. It is expected that the content for each area of study covered by the examination will reflect material substantially beyond what has been covered in any one course. In general, the field of study should be less general than a whole subfield of the discipline (e.g. more narrow than “Comparative Politics”) but broad enough to have a substantial literature (e.g. “Mexican Politics” or “EU Citizenship”).

This bibliographic work must be completed:

  • prior to gaining committee members’ signatures on the exam form, and
  • prior to the semester in which the student plans to take the exam.

Exam Format

The configuration of the exam will depend in part upon the agreement the student makes with each faculty committee member. However, each exam should comprise either: 1) Two written exams, one per subject area as defined with each of the two examiners; or 2) One written exam and one analytical essay. In addition, once the written portion is completed, the student has to meet with both committee members for a mandatory Oral defense.


Written Exams

Written exams can either take place at home with an open-book format, or take place on campus in a closed-book format, as per the agreement with each examining committee member. Open-book exams should each be completed within one day and may be spread out over the course of a week. Closed-book exams will be completed in a shorter time-frame, and in a location agreed upon with the concerned committee member. To receive a “pass,” the written part of the examination must include a comprehensive review of appropriate literature and a cogent discussion of the topic.


Analytical Essay

The analytical essay should be approximately 25-30 pages. While it may take various forms (e.g. focused research paper, literature synthesis), it must be analytical in content, including a comprehensive review of appropriate literature and a cogent discussion of the topic; a purely descriptive account or narrative would be insufficient. The student may confer with the supervising committee member about the essay content or structure during the time s/he is writing prior to the week of exams. The essay will be due in the department office on the first day of the written exams. Failure to complete the essay by that date constitutes failure for the essay segment of the comprehensive exam.


Oral Defense

An oral defense is mandatory. Both committee members must attend. Students are responsible for arranging in advance the date and time of the oral defense. The written exam materials will be provided to both committee members prior to the oral. Examiners take primary responsibility for evaluating student performance on the exam segment associated with their subject area, but may raise substantive questions from any of the three segments during the oral exam.


Grades

There are three possible results of the Comprehensive Exam: Pass with distinction; Pass; Fail
The first (Pass with distinction) applies to the exam as a whole, and will have to be arrived at jointly by both committee members. The decision to “Pass” or “Fail” a student could apply to just one of the two exams, and as such can be arrived at by the individual committee members.

Students who acquire a “Pass with distinction” will be officially notified in writing by the Graduate Advisor, in addition to being verbally informed by their committee members immediately after the Oral defense. Their accomplishment will also be highlighted at the Graduation ceremony


Repeat Exams

Students who fail in one or more subject area may re-take that segment in a subsequent semester. Only one re-take will be permitted. There is no oral defense on repeat exams. Students who fail twice on any portion of the exam will not be awarded the MA by Plan B, though they may elect to write a thesis (Plan A).

No comprehensive examinations will be offered during the summer semester.


Examination Schedule
  • Summer and Fall 2021: Decide which faculty members you might like to have sit on your exam committee and which subfields/topics you would like to focus on. Hold preliminary conversations with the prospective exam committee and do literature searches/reviews of the subfields. Prepare bibliographies with prospective exam members. Begin to read and review these materials.
  • December 3, 2021: Last day to confirm the composition of the exam committee and define the content and format of the exam. The signed exam committee form is due to the Graduate Adviser on this date, along with complete and final bibliographies that have been approved by each exam committee member. Any student failing to meet this deadline will not be eligible to take exams the following semester, except by special petition and the consent of both committee members.
  • Spring 2022: Finish preparing for exams.
  • February 18, 2022: Last day to confirm written and oral exam dates, submitting them to Graduate Adviser.
  • April 6-15, 2022: Written Exams. The first exam day is also the final due date for an analytical essay.
  • April 18-29, 2022: Oral Exams.
  • May 5, 2022: Last day for the department to report successful completion of Comprehensive Exams to the Graduate Division for a Spring graduation.
  • Spring 2022: Decide which faculty members you might like to have sit on your exam committee and which subfields/topics you would like to focus on. Hold preliminary conversations with the prospective exam committee and do literature searches/reviews of the subfields. Prepare bibliographies with prospective exam members. Begin to read and review these materials.
  • May 27, 2022: Last day to confirm the composition of the exam committee and define the content and format of the exam. The signed exam committee form is due to the Graduate Adviser on this date, along with complete and final bibliographies that have been approved by each exam committee member. Any student failing to meet this deadline will not be eligible to take exams the following semester, except by special petition and the consent of both committee members.
  • Summer and Fall 2022: Finish preparing for exams.
  • September 23, 2022: Last day to confirm written and oral exam dates, submitting them to Graduate Adviser.
  • November 9-18: Written Exams. The first exam day is also the final due date for an analytical essay.
  • November 21-December 2: Oral Exams.
  • First week of December 2022: Last day for the department to report successful completion of Comprehensive Exams to the Graduate Division for a Fall graduation. (See the university’s academic calendar for exact date).
  • Summer and Fall 2022: Decide which faculty members you might like to have sit on your exam committee and which subfields/topics you would like to focus on. Hold preliminary conversations with the prospective exam committee and do literature searches/reviews of the subfields. Prepare bibliographies with prospective exam members. Begin to read and review these materials.
  • December 2, 2022: Last day to confirm the composition of the exam committee and define the content and format of the exam. The signed exam committee form is due to the Graduate Adviser on this date, along with complete and final bibliographies that have been approved by each exam committee member. Any student failing to meet this deadline will not be eligible to take exams the following semester, except by special petition and the consent of both committee members.
  • Spring 2023: Finish preparing for exams.
  • February 17, 2023: Last day to confirm written and oral exam dates, submitting them to Graduate Adviser.
  • April 5-14, 2023: Written Exams. The first exam day is also the final due date for an analytical essay.
  • April 17-28, 2023: Oral Exams.
  • First week of May, 2023: Last day for the department to report successful completion of Comprehensive Exams to the Graduate Division for a Spring graduation. (See the university’s academic calendar for exact date).
  • Spring 2023: Decide which faculty members you might like to have sit on your exam committee and which subfields/topics you would like to focus on. Hold preliminary conversations with the prospective exam committee and do literature searches/reviews of the subfields. Prepare bibliographies with prospective exam members. Begin to read and review these materials.
  • May 26, 2023: Last day to confirm the composition of the exam committee and define the content and format of the exam. The signed exam committee form is due to the Graduate Adviser on this date, along with complete and final bibliographies that have been approved by each exam committee member. Any student failing to meet this deadline will not be eligible to take exams the following semester, except by special petition and the consent of both committee members.
  • Summer and Fall 2023: Finish preparing for exams.
  • September 22, 2023: Last day to confirm written and oral exam dates, submitting them to Graduate Adviser.
  • November 8-17, 2023: Written Exams. The first exam day is also the final due date for an analytical essay.
  • November 20-December 1, 2023: Oral Exams.
  • First week of December 2023: Last day for the department to report successful completion of Comprehensive Exams to the Graduate Division for a Fall graduation. (See the university’s academic calendar for exact date).


Download: Committee Form -- to be submitted to the Grad Advisor along with complete bibliographies by the dates indicated above in order to qualify for taking exams.

Download: Evaluation Form -- to be brought to the oral exam by the student, signed by the committee, and submitted to the Grad Advisor by the committee chair afterwards.

Theses and Exams are equally challenging, but they require different kinds of enterprise. You should make your decision based on your own strengths and educational goals. Theses require you to take on an entrepreneurial, creative role in finding a research question and method that contributes something original to the existing literature. Some students find this process very welcome and empowering after spending a lot of time learning what other scholars have to say. Writing a thesis is also a very good idea if you are considering going on for a PhD or getting a job that will require research or written analysis. It develops a wide range of skills and is a good place to test your own aptitude for research and discover whether you enjoy it.

The Exam option demands less in the way of original and independent analysis, but it requires you to demonstrate greater mastery of a wider range of academic literatures. Exams ask you to become very proficient in the literatures of two separate subfields/topics, such that you can write a paper or answer an exam question about it in a short period of time. Preparation for exams can require more reading than theses, and exams ask you to perform under pressure. If you do not pass both fields of your exam the first time, you are permitted one opportunity to retake the failed field(s) the following semester. Students may choose the exam option if they:

  1. do not feel an interest in or aptitude for independent writing and research; or
  2. prefer the more predictable schedule of exams, which may be easier to plan one’s life around. 

File an Application for Graduation with the Graduate Division the semester in which you intend to graduate. If you do not complete your degree requirements in time, you must reapply for graduation the following semester.

For more information on this sequence, see the Graduate Division webpage: Master’s Degree – Procedural Steps.

 

How to Apply

Graduate Advisor

Professor Kristen Maher
Office: Nasatir Hall (NH) 121
Email: [email protected]

Advising Hours

  • In-person advising, Fall 2021:
    TH 1:30-3:30 pm or by appointment, NH 121
  • Virtual advising, Fall 2021:
    T/W 3:00-4:00 pm or by appointment
    Zoom link

Important Links